How to Care for Florist's Plants

Many florist's plants can serve as long-lasting flower arrangments in the home and make excellent gifts.  What distinguishes florist's plants from other blooming indoor plants is their length of time in the home.  Florist's plants (like mums, poinsettias, and azaleas) are intended to be temporary indoor plants, whereas flowering houseplants (like African violets, orchids, or holiday cacti) are intended to remain in the home season after season.

Purchase plants with just a few open flowers to maximize the duration of bloom in the home.  If transporting florist's plants when outdoor temperatures are below 45°F, be sure to protect the plant with plastic or paper sleeves.  Have the car warmed up and minimize the length of exposure to cold temperatures. 

Many florist's plants have complicated blooming requirements, making them difficult to force into bloom again. Additionally, nearly all of them are not cold-hardy enough in Iowa to be planted as perennials in the outdoor garden. Because of this, flowering florist's plants are usually discarded after the blooms fade.

Learn more about how to care for your florist's plants below.

Information on the Care of Florist Plants

Forced Daffodils
Forced Spring Bulbs
Azalea
Azalea
Hydrangea
Hydrangea
Cineraria
Cineraria
Pocketbook Plant Photo by zivlakovicdarko Adobe PhotoStock
Pocketbook Plant
Miniature Rose
Miniature Rose
Primrose
Primrose
Gloxinia
Gloxinia 
Gardenia
Gardenia
Cyclamen
Cyclamen
Kalanchoe
Kalanchoe
Gerber Daisy
Gerber Daisy
Mum Photo by Hanna Tor Adobe PhotoStock
Mum
Easter Lily Photo by Gabrielle Adobe PhotoStock
Easter Lily
Poinsettia
Poinsettia
Amaryllis
Amaryllis
Paperwhite Bulbs Photo by Annora Adobe PhotoStock
Paperwhites
Authors:
Last reviewed:
February 2023